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Choeff Levy Fischman Design Available for $25M Featured on Forbes

https-blogs-images-forbes-com-amydobson-files-2019-02-bal-bay-drive-exterior-1200x798Imagine living in a brand-new, tri-level waterfront home with an open-concept floor plan, plenty of room for entertaining, and floor-to-ceiling expansive sliding glass doors with curtain wall windows to complete indoor-outdoor resort-style living. As featured on Forbes this month, take a tour of this newly listed dream home designed by award-winning architects at Choeff Levy Fischman!

There’s a new home overlooking Biscayne Bay that could become the highest priced single-family home in Bal Harbour if it sells for its $24.95 million asking price. Designed by team Choeff Levy Fischman—the same architects behind the ‘floating’ home of a certain famous rapper—this 8-bedroom, 9-bath house makes use of a similar architectural approach so that the whole home feels like it is floating both indoors and out. Bal Harbour is at the very northern tip of Miami Beach and has some of the highest priced real estate for the area.

To read more on this “floating” home visit Forbes.

Stantec Completes Solitair Brickell, Miami’s Newest and Boldest Residential Building

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Stantec has made its own unique mark in the Miami skyline with the design of the new 50-story Solitair Brickell residential building. The tower features a unique zig-zagging façade that’s inspired by the Medjool date palm tree.

Miami’s architectural landscape, especially surrounding Brickell City Centre, is synonymous with reinvention. The latest beacon of change is Solitair Brickell, a bold residential tower designed by Stantec and developed by ZOM Living. The 50-story high-rise sports a unique angular basket-weave facade that riffs on the Medjool date palm tree commonly seen in South Florida. Inside, 438 residential units ranging from studios to two penthouse suites come with millennial-friendly amenities such as a billiards lounge, luxury cabanas, one of Miami’s highest rooftop resort–style pools, a fitness center, outdoor yoga space, and 6,200 square feet of ground retail space.

To read more visit Interior Design.

Stambul Acquires the Historic Walgreens Building in Downtown Miami

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Stambul, a family-owned and operated, full-service boutique construction and development firm, finalized the purchase of the historic Walgreens building in Downtown Miami for $19.75 million. Located at 200 East Flagler St., the building was owned by the Alonso family and was once home to La Epoca Department Store. Stambul plans to transform the approximately 50,000 sq. ft. building into a multi-level entertainment complex, which will serve as a catalyst for Downtown Miami’s resurgence.

The iconic Walgreens building at 200 E. Flagler St. in downtown Miami has a new owner with big plans for the future of the historic property.

The Miami-based construction and development firm Stambul paid $19.75 million for the 50,000 square-foot building. The sale closed on Friday.

The building was put up for sale in June 2016 by the Alonso family, who owned the department store La Epoca that had operated out of the location since 2005. The store closed in November 2016.

The five-story building, which was entered into the National Register of Historic Places in 1988 and cannot be torn down, will be turned into a multi-level collection of high-end restaurants, retail and entertainment venues.

“We are meticulously and thoughtfully curating and overseeing vendors, spaces and activities that will integrate to provide an organic experience,” Stambul’s Principal Daniel Peña Giraldi said in a press release. “Stambul wants to be a key player in the rebirth of Downtown Miami and its evolution into a culinary and entertainment destination for locals and tourists.

To read more, visit The Miami Herald.

Stantec Breaks Ground on Atelier in the Dallas Arts District

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Global architecture and design firm Stantec has broken ground on Atelier, the 41-story residential building located in the heart of the Dallas Arts District. Atelier, which means “artist workshop”, is designed to support the District’s local artists and residents with an appreciation for the arts and urban living.

The mixed-use high-rise will feature 364 luxury residential units and 52 mixed-income artist’s lofts that include 43 affordable artist residences. The project also includes an amenity deck with a pool, 15,000 square-feet of retail and gallery and exhibit space.

“Atelier is being built on the idea of patronage. The building’s modern design will integrate with its neighboring performing and visual arts venues, while also supporting local artists, residents and community members who share a common need to create beauty,” said Andrew Burnett, principal at Stantec’s Miami office, which is leading the architecture and interior design of Atelier.

After years of waiting, developers are set to break ground today on Atelier, which in its most recent incarnation is a 41-story luxury high‐rise in the Dallas Arts District.

The mixed‐use development, which is marketing itself as the tallest rental tower in the Dallas area, will be comprised of 364 residential tower units with sweeping views of Uptown and downtown Dallas.

The project between the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center will have over 26,000 square feet of amenity space and 15,000 square feet of onsite retail.

Atelier is also planned to be home to Flora Lofts, 52 affordable artist lofts developed by DFW architect Graham Greene.

In addition, there will be 157 hourly‐fee public parking spaces in the underground structure and 553 resident spaces in a 10‐story parking garage.

Orlando-based multifamily developer Zom Living is developing Atelier in partnership with affiliates of Daiwa House Texas Inc. and Itochu Corp.

To read more, visit The Dallas Business Journal.

17 West Mixed-Use Development in Miami Beach Tops Off

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Architecture and design firm Stantec, Grycon, Turnberry Associates and Elion Partners celebrated the topping off of the five-story 17 West mixed-use development, which includes residences and Miami’s second Trader Joe’s grocery store. Located on 17th Street between Alton Road and West Avenue in Miami Beach, the 185,388 square foot project will include 23 residential units, a rooftop pool deck with a gym, ground level commercial space and a public garage with 193 parking spaces. The residential units range from one bedroom to three bedrooms. The project is scheduled for completion in January 2019.

Midtown 8 Residential Development in Midtown Miami Tops Off

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Architecture and design firm Stantec, Kast Construction and developer Wood Partners celebrated the topping off of the 28-story Midtown 8 residential development located on a two-acre site at 2901 and 2951 NE 1st Avenue in Midtown Miami. The mixed-use development includes 387 residences, retail space and parking.

When completed in May 2019, Midtown 8 will feature 30,000 sq. ft. of commercial space, an amenity deck above an attached 519-car garage, 27 Citi Bike spots, a clubhouse, a landscaped linear outdoor space with dog walk area and a colorful mural art wall expressive of the neighborhood. The residential units range from studios, one-bedrooms, two-bedrooms, and three-bedroom penthouses with elevated ceilings.

Other residential amenities include a co-working space in the lobby, spacious hammock garden, a rocking chair lounge area, yoga studio, demonstration kitchen and juice bar. The outdoor amenity spaces will have lush greenery and green walls creating an inviting and relaxing oasis for residents.

Stantec Designing Amenity-Driven Residential Buildings to Attract Millennials

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South Florida developers and architects are challenged to attract millennials by meeting both the price points and features that millennials are seeking. Multifamily residential developers must even re-think pricing, technological amenities, transportation and parking elements if they want to attract young buyers and renters. Architecture and design firm Stantec in Miami is implementing co-working spaces, communal kitchens and billiard lounges in their designs to appeal to this growing population. Their projects offer residents all the modern amenities to be expected of an upscale apartment community in an urban setting. According to Jon Cardello, Vice President of Stantec’s Miami office, “communal kitchens, like the ones at Vu New River in Fort Lauderdale, are a popular amenity for millennials. They are more likely to eat out or order takeout than cook at home, so they can have smaller kitchens in their apartments. The communal kitchens, with several ovens and a host of cooking appliances, allow them to throw parties and host family gatherings.”

Developers in South Florida are changing how they plan and design homes to attract the fast-growing millennial population, a group that faces unique challenges in the residential market.

Their construction initiatives are critical to preserving the building industry’s future bottom line. But businesses and cities have a stake, too. With more than 75 million people nationwide, the millennial generation will soon make up the heart of the workforce, and companies will decide to locate and grow in communities that can attract them.

“We are competing more with other cities in other states for housing options for them,’’ said Art Falcone, managing principal of Boca Raton-based Encore Capital Management.

For local developers, millennials present a huge opportunity – and a big challenge. The tri-county region ranks near the bottom among major metropolitan areas for millennials as a share of the total population, and leads the nation for the highest percentage of young people living with their parents.

High housing prices, below-average wages, and a strained transportation network present major obstacles to homeownership for millennials here. Deep college debt also means many recent graduates are on a tight budget, so they must be prudent with housing costs.

But developers are adapting, offering price points and features that differ from South Florida’s traditional garden apartments and country club communities to appeal to millennials.

To read the full story, visit South Florida Business Journal.

Choeff Levy Fischman Highlights Tropical Modernism in The Wall Street Journal

img_3139Forget thatched roofs, flamingo-pink tiles and cheesy wooden carvings. Homeowners in warm-weather climes increasingly want the look of laid-back, low-key luxury.

Tropical modern, as the style is called, combines the clean lines and muted color palette of contemporary design with the exotic woods and stone found in island homes. Many affluent buyers are willing to pay a premium for tropical-modern homes.

The style “is having quite a big revival,” says architect Iain Jackson, a professor at the Liverpool School of Architecture in the U.K. who studies tropical architecture. He says the look is popular in Hawaii, Bali, the Maldives and other high-end destinations, where it has “taken on a much more glamorous and seductive high-end feel.” At the same time, he says, the designs “are borrowing from local vernacular traditions.”

Homeowners are starting to ask for tropical modern homes by name, says Paul Fischman, partner at Choeff Levy Fischman, a Miami-based architecture firm that specializes in the style. Mr. Fischman brings exterior materials such as limestone inside for a more cohesive look between indoor and outdoor living. Colors are cool whites or beige. The designs are the opposite of the colorful Art Deco homes once popular in the city, he says. “There’s no flamingo pink,” he adds.

In Miami, attorney Howard Srebnick was inspired by Balinese architecture to build a tropical-modern home in place of a run-down Mediterranean-style home that had been on the property. To maximize the views of Biscayne Bay, Mr. Srebnick worked with architects at Choeff Levy Fischman to design a home where the “emphasis was on the outside,” he says. Mr. Srebnick, 54, spent nearly $3 million to build the five-bedroom, 9,600-square-foot home, where he lives with his wife, Sharon, and two school-age children.

Read the full Wall Street Journal story here.

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Golf Resorts Near the Sea featuring Four Seasons Resort Estates Nevis

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When Daniel Buttafuoco needs a break from his busy legal practice and  bitter New York winters, he and his wife fly to the Caribbean island of Nevis. There he unwinds with a round of golf on a course that climbs up a mountain through lush rain forest before descending to the edge of the Caribbean Sea.

“It’s beautiful,” says Mr. Buttafuoco, who is 58 years old. “There are monkeys all over the golf course. The views are stunning.”

The Buttafuocos currently own a three-bedroom villa at the Four Seasons Resort Estates, but they’re considering upgrading to a four-bedroom, 3,400-square-foot home in a new Four Seasons development called Villas at Pinney’s Beach. The property, located on the fourth fairway and just a short walk from the sea, costs $4.2 million. It features a contemporary design, with vaulted ceilings and walls of glass that open to a patio, pool and guest cottage. Interior appointments include white marble countertops, mahogany doors and Bosch and Thermador kitchen appliances.

The Nevis villas are among a handful of new luxury developments cropping up around the Caribbean that appeal not only to golf enthusiasts like Mr. Buttafuoco, but to beach-lovers and those who want family-friendly activities. These days, beach resorts are wooing buyers with everything from high-end fitness centers to equestrian facilities to water parks for children, says Neal Sroka, who specializes in global marketing for resort properties at Douglas Elliman Real Estate in New York.

When Mr. Buttafuoco isn’t on the Robert Trent Jones II-designed golf course, he says he sometimes heads to the spa for a massage or haircut. His wife loves lounging on the beach and dining at one of several restaurants. And his grandchildren can choose among activities that include crab hunting and nature walks.

Read the full Wall Street Journal Story here

The changing face of Miami Beach’s Di Lido Island: Choeff Levy Fischman has 14 properties either completed, under construction or under design

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Take a drive through Miami Beach’s Venetian Islands and you’ll notice a quiet transformation taking place compared to years past. On Di Lido, the third Venetian island from the east, about 15 homes are under construction, older homes are for sale, and vacant lots are on the market.

The island is a snapshot of the current movement in Miami Beach to tear down older homes and build modern mansions.

Architecture firm Choeff Levy Fischman, which has designed the South Florida residences of several celebrities and international business leaders, has 14 properties either completed, under construction or under design on Di Lido. Those completed include 212 West Dilido, 303 East Dilido Drive and 440 West Dilido Drive.  Architect Paul Fischman recently toured the island with The Real Deal.

Read the full Real Deal story here