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Jalal Farooq on Preparing for 2018 Hurricane Season

7-2-18

Twice a year, the Miami Herald enlists new members for its CEO Roundtable. Jalal Farooq, principal and leader of Al-Farooq Corporation’s team of engineers, was chosen among select executives at small, large and nonprofit businesses. Farooq earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Florida International University and graduated from Stanford University with a master’s degree in structural engineering and geomechanics. Each week, Miami Herald asks its CEO Roundtable a question about a topic of interest to South Floridians.

As South Florida gets ready for what’s expected to be another active hurricane season, Jalal Farooq tells the Miami Herald how he’s preparing his business and what South Florida should be aware of on Miami Herald’s CEO Roundtable.

“As a business, the most important thing to make sure is that our data is secure, and we’ve done that,” says Jalal Farooq, principal and senior project engineer at Al-Farooq Corporation. “We specialize in engineering for impact-resistant windows, doors and building envelopes, and I would remind everyone that South Florida has the toughest hurricane codes in the country. With that in mind, if I were in an older building, I would have it checked out by a structural engineer.”

Al-Farooq Corporation has completed more than 15,000 projects around the country and is considered #1 in product approvals in South Florida. In business for more than 35 years, the Miami-based engineering firm is responsible for more than 50% of all Notice of Acceptance (NOA’s) in South Florida.

To read more, visit Miami Herald.

OBR’s Favorite Miami Buildings

Though Miami is known for its pastel-colored hotels on South Beach, its architecture is defined by a number of contrasting styles. Architects and developers have been transforming Miami’s cityscape into one of the new architectural capitals of America. From a contemporary luxury high-rise to a historical Spanish hotel, we’ve curated a list of our top 5 most iconic buildings.

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The Biltmore Hotel

The Biltmore Hotel was built in 1926 by hotel magnate John McEntee Bowman and land developer George Merrick, who combined his deep affection for lush South Florida landscape with a high regard for Italian, Moorish and Spanish architectural influences to create this architectural gem. The Biltmore Hotel was initially the tallest building in Florida at 315 feet and, today, its 23,000 square-foot pool is one of the largest hotel pools in the continental United States. The Biltmore’s rich history makes it Coral Gables’ most preeminent historic landmark.

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1111 Lincoln

The iconic garage on the west end of Lincoln Road was designed by world-renowned architects Herzog & de Meuron. The open-air structure rises seven stories and includes office space, retail, parking spaces and a mysterious rooftop penthouse. The seventh floor of the garage is also where 1111 Vibe hosts Skywave Yoga on Monday evenings. The view from the top overlooks Lincoln Road, Alton Road and as far as the shores of Biscayne Bay.

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Solitair Brickell

Solitair Brickell, the latest luxury high-rise gracing Miami’s skyline, was recently completed by global architecture and design firm Stantec. The design of the 50-story building distinguishes itself with a unique angular, towering basket-weave design inspired by the majestic Medjool date palm tree popular in South Florida’s tropical landscape. Developed by ZOM Living, Solitair Brickell includes 483 residential units, millennial-friendly amenities and one of the highest rooftop resort-style pools in Miami.

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New World Center

The New World Center is a concert hall in the heart of South Beach, home to the New World Symphony, a post-graduate orchestral academy. A collaboration between the symphony’s artistic director, 11-time Grammy award-winning conductor, Michael Tilson Thomas, and Pritzker Prize-winning architect Frank Gehry, the building features multiple flexible spaces, cutting-edge media equipment, six stories of natural light and views of the iconic Miami Beach Art Deco skyline. A new 2.5-acre public park designed by the firm West 8, features the New World Center’s SoundScape park where New World Symphony WALLCAST concerts are presented on the building’s 7,000-square-foot projection wall.

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One Thousand Museum

One Thousand Museum is a high-rise residential condominium under construction in Downtown Miami designed by the late Pritzker Prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid. When completed, the 62-story building is expected to rise over 700 feet, making it one of the tallest buildings in Miami. The design of the building distinguishes itself with the contrast between the robust exoskeleton and the crystalline glazing of the glass façade beneath it. Gregg Covin, Todd Michael Glaser, Louis Birdman, Kevin Venger, Gilberto Bomeny and Regalia Group are the developers.

PCCSF’s Dr. Allan Greissman honored with JDCH Circle of Friends Award

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Dr. Allan Greissman of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida was recently honored by Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital Circle of Friends for his outstanding work as a pediatric intensivist.

JDCH’s Circle of Friends is part of the hospital’s giving societies. The award recognizes physicians that exemplify the spirit and mission of the hospital and provide extraordinary care for JDCH patients, families and community.

As a senior member of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida since 1994, Dr. Greissman develops procedural sedation programs, the care of the chronically ventilated patient and community outreach. He actively lectures throughout the South Florida community on various topics related to pediatrics.

Congratulations Dr. Greissman and thank you for your work!

Schüco Partners with Al-Farooq to Enter South Florida Market

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Schüco USA has partnered with Al-Farooq Corporation to enter the South Florida market with the release of several products in 2018. Al-Farooq was contracted by the global building envelope specialist to test and approve the products to assure they meet South Florida’s high standards and regulations. The first product launched this month, an outward opening terrace door, is the first of its kind for the region. Al-Farooq Corporation is currently testing several other products for Schüco that should be released in South Florida later this year – just in time for hurricane season.

Al-Farooq Corporation, a Miami-based engineering consulting firm, is helping Schüco USA enter the South Florida market with the release of an outward opening terrace door, the Schüco AWS 75.SI+.

The global building envelope specialist has contracted the South Florida engineering firm to launch the product. Al-Farooq Corporation has tested and approved the product to assure it meets the rigorous standards and regulations for the hurricane market.

Ideal for South Florida’s rainy and windy seasonal climate, the terrace doors were designed for high-level water tightness.

The design consists of easy-access threshold options, which meets ADA half-inch threshold height limitations while also maintaining 15 PSF of water resistance test performance, far exceeding minimum requirements.

“It has been great to work with Schüco,” says Senior Engineer, Jalal Farooq. “Their team is knowledgeable, responsive, and their products are recognized around the world. We are pleased that they have chosen Al-Farooq Corporation to guide them to success in this hurricane market.”

To read the full story, visit Glass on Web.

PCCSF’s Dr. Greissman Weighs in on the Truth About Tamiflu

3-20-18

Dr. Allan Greissman of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida discussed with Motherly Tamiflu’s safety. As the only treatment for the flu, it’s important for parents to be aware of the medication’s potential side effects, especially during this deadly flu season.

This year’s flu season is already the worst North America has endured in a decade—which is, of course, a concern for parents of young children, who are more likely to experience serious complications from the illness.

If you or your children are struck by the flu, your health care provider is likely to write up a prescription for Tamiflu: If taken within 48 hours of symptom appearance, the antiviral drug may lessen the duration and severity of the flu. This application is recommended by both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for use in infants as young as 2 weeks old.

It is also approved for preventative treatment, meaning it may help other members in the household avoid the flu if a member of the family has already been diagnosed with the illness.

For parents of young children or those at higher risk for flu complications, this makes Tamiflu a particularly good option, says Allan Greissman, MD, a pediatric critical care specialist at Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida.

“Unfortunately this year we are seeing a large number of flu-positive pediatric patients having a very serious strain of the flu. We are also seeing many more deaths from the flu and many kids with other significant problems related to the flu,” Greissman tells Motherly. “So for that reason, getting a flu shot and treatment with Tamiflu should strongly be considered.”

To read the full story, visit Motherly.

PCCSF Treats South Florida Toddler for the Flu

Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida’s Dr. Allan Greissman shared with Local 10 News the story of Michael, a 3-year-old Ft. Lauderdale boy who recently underwent critical treatment for the flu.

During this deadly flu season, the CDC is reporting 53 child deaths and is warning that we have not seen the worst of it yet. According to Dr. Greissman, the most common reason for a child with the flu to be admitted to PCCSF is high-grade fever or dehydration. Michael, like many patients who are admitted to PCCSF, began to suffer from “end-organ disease” as he fought off the flu.

Michael is a reminder of how dangerous this flu season is and the importance of getting the flu shot.

HOLLYWOOD, Fla. – Michael celebrated his 3rd birthday at Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital, the pediatric unit of Memorial Regional Hospital in Hollywood.

His mom said he first got a rash and complained of joint pain. Then he had a fever. Eventually, tests showed the toddler was infected with an aggressive form of the flu.

“Michael had a lot of what we call ‘end organ disease.’ It affected his neurological status, it affected his heart,” Dr. Allan Greissman said. “It affected his kidneys, it affected his lungs and it affected his liver.”

Greissman, a pediatric critical care specialist at Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida at the hospital, said Michael is recovering, but Dylan Winnick was not so lucky. The 12-year-old from West Palm Beach is among the 53 other children who have died of the flu around the nation. The Centers for Disease Control had bad news again Friday. The flu season has intensified and there are more weeks of suffering ahead.

One of every 14 visits to doctors and clinics were for fever, cough and other symptoms of the flu. That’s the highest level since the swine flu pandemic in 2009. Last week, 42 states reported high patient traffic for the flu, up from 39.

Hospital stays because of the flu also increased.

To read the full story, visit Local 10 News.

Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida Featured on Local 10 2-2-18 from Diana Somarriba on Vimeo.

Why Amazon Should Choose Miami for HQ2

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Yesterday, it was announced that Miami made Amazon’s top 20 list of potential cities for its second headquarters, HQ2. The new facility will cost at least $5 billion to construct and operate and will create as many as 50,000 high-paying jobs. Home to a diverse population that is entrepreneurial by nature, here’s why we think Miami is the perfect spot for Amazon’s HQ2:

– Jeff Bezos is a Miami Palmetto Senior High alumnus! In 1982, he was valedictorian, a National Merit Scholar and Silver Knight award winner, and he was already beginning to make big plans for his future. I guess you can say Miami molded him for success, so this is his opportunity to give back!

– Miami’s startup sector is booming! Just last year, the Miami-Fort Lauderdale area ranked No. 1 among 40 of the largest metro areas in the country for startups.

– With over 2,000 daily nonstop flights to major cities across the United States and the world, Miami is considered one of the country’s most well-connected cities.

– With proximity and access to major markets, Miami’s multilingual workforce understands global business. Businesses in a multicultural city, like Miami, can draw employees from different backgrounds and experiences to create innovative ideas.

– Florida’s new Brightline regional train system will connect Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach enabling passengers (and potential employees) to commute faster throughout South Florida.

– Home to hundreds of thousands of college students, Miami appeals to a vibrant millennial community. By being connected to the Internet throughout childhood and early adulthood, Millennials have a different perspective on how to lead, communicate and market.

As Amazon aims to stay competitive in the global marketplace, they should focus on a diverse, metropolitan region like Miami. With its history of welcoming all nationalities and languages, Miami is positioned to continue growing, and we hope it will do so with Amazon in its backyard.

OBR Marketing Gains McKenzie as New Client

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Oberhausen Marketing & Public Relations is proud to announce the addition of McKenzie to its premier client list. McKenzie is a boutique Miami-based design, construction and custom fabrication firm that works with some of the most recognizable brands and high-end residences throughout the South Florida area. Their work reflects their passion for creating beautiful projects and spaces that improve the quality of life for those who utilize and inhabit them. They provide high-quality construction and craft fabrication services while implementing sustainable building practices whenever possible.

Whether working with an outside architect’s design or constructing an in-house design-build project created by one of their architects, McKenzie strives to make the built product as beautiful as its original concept. Their projects in construction and craft showcase their love for working with wood, metal and concrete.

McKenzie’s most recent works include the design and construction of Michael Schwartz’s latest concept, Genuine Pizza. Part of Genuine Hospitality, Genuine Pizza was formerly known as Harry’s Pizzeria. The new outpost officially opened its door inside Aventura Mall’s new expansion wing early December and is part of a multi-city expansion to 18 new locations – all of which are scheduled to be designed by McKenzie.

McKenzie also worked with French designers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec to install a modular sun shade and seating system made from steel and colored glass in Miami Design District during Art Basel Miami Beach 2017. The permanent cloud-like canopy connects Paradise Plaza and Palm Court.

Additionally, McKenzie is serving as the executive architect and general contractor for Central Fare, a 50,000 square-foot food hall located at MiamiCentral. McKenzie is coordinating the design, construction and millwork of the project, and construction on Central Fare is slated to be completed by spring 2018.

Stay tuned to learn more about McKenzie’s upcoming projects.

MCAD’s Active Design Miami Helps Make Key Biscayne a Healthier Place to Live

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The Miami Center for Architecture & Design worked with the Village of Key Biscayne to implement its latest initiative Active Design Miami and make the village a healthier place to live, work and play for all residents.

With its small size, natural beauty and health-conscious population, Key Biscayne is an ideal place for an innovative program aimed at using design to encourage active lifestyles.

Active Design Miami, a program inspired by New York City’s Active Design Guidelines, sets policy and design strategies to create healthier streets, open spaces and buildings. In Key Biscayne, it found an advocate in Village Council member Brett Moss, whose day job is an architect, general contractor and founder of MOSS Architecture + Design.

Moss, who frequently puts the Active Design standards into play for buildings his firm designs, said the Village joined several other South Florida communities earlier this year in adopting the standards as guiding principles. He would like to see that lead to development that promotes parks, outdoor activity, walking and biking, etc.

“I’m hoping that as we update our vision in Key Biscayne, we keep encouraging people to be outside and walk and bike to different places,” he said. “We should be looking at that in future policy making, zoning, codes and ordinances.”

Moss noted the Active Design philosophy focuses on parks and open spaces, development patterns, transportation and mobility. “I think it’s something that we’re always looking at in Key Biscayne anyway, so it was kind of a no-brainer for me to bring this to the Council.”

Cheryl Jacobs, executive vice president of Miami Center for Architecture and Design, which spearheads the Active Design Miami initiative, agreed Key Biscayne is the perfect place for the guidelines to play out. She applauded the Village for being an early adapter, becoming one of the first of 10 municipal governments and the Miami-Dade County government to sign on.

“Quality of life is really important in Key Biscayne, and anything a municipality can do to give residents an opportunity to have a better quality of life is a positive for that community,” Jacobs said. “Highlighting things like bike share, park access, golf cart access paths is really a quality of life issue. Key Biscayne adopted the concepts so readily, because they have already done some of these things.”

To read the full story, visit Islander News.

PCCSF Treats Infant with Rare Immunodeficiency Disease

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Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida recently treated a patient suffering from an underlying immune deficiency disorder. The life-threatening diagnosis was discovered when the patient was just three months old.

Ryan Norton looks every bit a happy and healthy infant, a positive turn of events that his parents desperately needed.

Life is a little more normal for Sarah and Kevin Norton of Naples, yet their guard is always up for coughs and sniffles from anyone who comes into contact with Ryan. They want to avoid a new round of chaos.

Ryan, who will turn 1 next week, has a rare immunodeficiency disease called x- linked hyper IgM syndrome CD40L. It could land him back in a hospital on a ventilator and feeding tube, needing blood transfusions and antibiotics. He came home in late March after being hospitalized for all of those frightening interventions since mid-December. His parents never knew whether he would make it.

Ryan will have a bone marrow transplant, planned for next summer when he is a little stronger and older. His sister, Sophie, is a perfect bone marrow match. Sophie is 2½ years old.

The sibling match is a blessing that helps Sarah Norton, 27, and her husband, Kevin Norton, 29, stay upbeat that all should turn out well.

“We stay positive because we have to,” she said. “I wouldn’t be able to take care of him.”

She does Ryan’s immunoglobulin replacement infusions at home, and the family stays close to home to avoid Ryan being exposed to ill people. The sacrifices are hardest on Sophie who wants to go and do fun things, she said.

Finding more current research and medical information on Ryan’s condition also was difficult, Kevin Norton said.

The family has a good support network.

Sarah Norton’s parents live in the main house off Oakes Boulevard, with Sarah and Kevin in the guest house.

Publix has been a help — Kevin Norton is a grocery manager at the Publix at the Vineyards shopping center in North Naples.

Sarah Norton stays home now to take care of Ryan, but colleagues at her former job as manager of Pavilion Royal Scoop Ice Cream — near Paragon Pavilion theater in North Naples — did a fundraiser.

The couple has health insurance, but out-of-pocket expenses will mount when the bone marrow transplant gets done for travel and other costs. A GoFundMe account was established by Sarah Norton’s sister.

Broadly speaking, Ryan’s disease means part of the body’s immune system is missing or does not function properly, according to the Immune Deficiency Foundation in Towson, Maryland. These conditions are caused by hereditary or genetic defects. Some conditions affect a single part of the immune system. Others might affect more components of an individual’s immune system.

“He has a problem making the proper amount of immunoglobulins, which are vital for the body to fight infection,” Dr. Allan Greissman, a specialist with Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida at Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital in Hollywood, Florida. He admitted Ryan last December into Joe DiMaggio after he was transferred from NCH North Naples Hospital.

To read the full article, visit Naples Daily News.