Posts

PCCSF’s Dr. Gerald Lavandosky Gives Insight On When to Call 911

ambulance-architecture-building-263402

Emergencies are hectic and can often times be confusing. Is medical attention needed within minutes of the incident? Or can it be resolved at home or the following day with your primary physician? Dr. Gerald Lavandosky of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida weighed in on when you should and shouldn’t call 911 on Reader’s Digest.

You should call when you or someone else is experiencing a severe allergic reaction. If anyone begins showing signs of a severe allergic reaction – increased heart rate, difficulty breathing, swelling tongue – call 911. Severe allergic reactions can lead to death quickly – in under an hour – so you may not have enough time to get to the emergency department. Emergency responders can give immediate treatment with epinephrine.

“Parents and caregivers are not trained medical professionals, so making a medical decision as to whether an allergic reaction is 911-worth can be challenging,” says Gerald Lavandosky, MD a pediatric critical care doctor at Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida.

To read the full story, visit Reader’s Digest.

 

Miami Center for Architecture & Design Moves into New Space

54d553cb-a755-4392-85b0-87c9b8f361ff
The Miami Center of Architecture & Design recently celebrated the grand opening of its new space. Located at 310 SE 1st St., it is in the heart of Downtown Miami, bringing visibility to the organization, and the design and build of the environment.
With community meeting space and educational programs, MCAD is the place for anyone who is interested in enhancing their appreciation for the city’s vibrant and unique architecture and design. MCAD is home to AIA Miami as well as the Downtown Miami Welcome Center, in partnership with the Miami Downtown Development Authority. The Welcome Center is everything Miami – cultural events, attractions, maps, history and more.  MCAD educates the public through exhibitions, lectures, tours, film series and other programs that aim to reveal the richness of design in Miami.
To stay up to date with MCAD’s events. Visit https://miamicad.org/.

PCCSF’s Dr. Greissman Discusses Meningitis with HealthyWay

meningitis-hailshadow

What may seem as a normal cold or flu could instead be the potentially life-threatening infection, meningitis. Because it’s important to act quickly, patients should understand the telltale signs of meningitis and take the appropriate medical action. Dr. Allan Greissman of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida shared with HealthyWay what symptoms patients should look out for.

Everyone gets sick from time to time. But sometimes, what we think of as a normal cold or flu might actually be far more dangerous. With flu season fast approaching, it’s important to understand and recognize the difference between normal illness and more serious conditions.

If flu-like symptoms come on and escalate quickly, it may mean you or a loved one has actually contracted meningitis. Meningitis is an infection that causes our meninges—the membranes that provide a protective barrier for the brain and spinal cord—to swell.

Meningitis is a serious condition that requires immediate attention from a medical professional. It can be life-threatening if left untreated, so it is important to understand the telltale symptoms. When you can spot symptoms early on, you can quickly seek out medical attention that can mitigate the negative effects of the disease.

Understanding the Types of Meningitis

There are a few different types of meningitis, but bacterial and viral meningitis are the two most common.

Bacterial meningitis is the most severe form of meningitis and can be fatal, especially if treatment is delayed. There are many types of bacteria that can cause meningitis, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Group B Streptococcus, and Listeria monocytogenes.

Thankfully, the introduction of and increased access to safe and effective vaccines resulted in a steady decrease in bacterial meningitis cases since the 1990s. However, cases that do occur are dangerous and can be fatal if left untreated.

Bacterial meningitis is treated with oral or IV antibiotics, and treatment can last between 10 and 21 days, according to Allan Greissman, MD, of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida.

The second most commonly experienced meningitis is viral meningitis. Although there is no vaccine for viral meningitis, you can be vaccinated against some of the viruses that could cause meningitis, like measles, mumps, or influenza.

It helps to think of viral meningitis as a potential complication of these other viruses. This means that, although you might catch measles, mumps, or the flu from someone with viral meningitis, that doesn’t necessarily mean you will also develop viral meningitis.

“Viral meningitis will run its course and should not [be], and is not, treated with IV antibiotics,” says Greissman. He notes that one exception is a form of viral meningitis caused by the herpes viruses, which is treated with an antiviral medication.

To read the full story, visit Healthy Way.

Wesley Kean, Principal & Founder of Award-Winning Architecture and Design Firm, KoDA

© Azeez Bakare Studios

© Azeez Bakare Studios


Architect Wesley Kean, Principal & Founder of Miami Beach-based architecture and design firm KoDA, is designing with ambition for its clients and optimism for the world. He is an expert in connecting architecture with nature and finding radical solutions to sea-level rise and other environmental concerns conducive to South Florida and other coastal communities.
Wesley and his team specialize in offering creative solutions and design services for all scales and types of architecture including retail, residential and large urban projects.
The award-winning firm uses analysis and research to develop the design of highly distinctive buildings, landscapes, interiors and experiences. Wesley is a leader in Metabolism, a post-war Japanese architectural movement that fused ideas about architectural mega structures with those of organic biological growth. His view on “How Metabolist Ideas Can Potentially Solve Sea-Level Rise Vulnerability” has been published in AIA’s Florida/Caribbean Architect magazine.
An active member of the AIA and NCARB and a visiting critic at the University of Miami, Florida International University and Miami-Dade College, the New Hampshire native is also a champion of the Make-A-Wish Foundation and a member of the Miami Music Project soundboard. For the upcoming Miami Art Week, Wesley will be showcasing his artistic talents. As part of a creative campaign for the Miami Music Project, KoDA’s “Miami Music Box” exhibit will be on display at RAW POP UP art show that’s taking place at the historic Burdines flagship building in downtown Miami.
Head to KoDA’s website or follow them on social media @kodamiami.

Construction at SoLē Mia Picks Up

867232_preview

Construction is rapidly picking up at SoLē Mia – a community that will rise at 15045 Biscayne Boulevard. As the largest project in North Miami’s history, SoLē Mia is set to become South Florida’s next iconic neighborhood blending the serenity of open spaces with the vibrancy of an urban center.

Construction on the site went vertical at the end of 2017 with SoLē Mia’s first two residential towers and the Warren Henry Automobile Dealership consisting of Land Rover, Jaguar and Infiniti. The site’s Costco is quickly moving along and will be a tenant of The Shops at SoLē Mia. The development will reshape the North Miami landscape and transform the area into an exciting destination for guests and residents. When completed, SoLē Mia Miami will feature 4,390 residences, approximately 500,000 square feet of lifestyle shopping, emerald green community parks, chef-driven restaurants, entertainment venues and office spaces.

With construction on the SoLē Mia site pushing forward, SoLē Mia’s Local Preference Office is offering City of North Miami residents short- and long-term job opportunities in various construction trades.

Jalal Farooq on Preparing for 2018 Hurricane Season

7-2-18

Twice a year, the Miami Herald enlists new members for its CEO Roundtable. Jalal Farooq, principal and leader of Al-Farooq Corporation’s team of engineers, was chosen among select executives at small, large and nonprofit businesses. Farooq earned his bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Florida International University and graduated from Stanford University with a master’s degree in structural engineering and geomechanics. Each week, Miami Herald asks its CEO Roundtable a question about a topic of interest to South Floridians.

As South Florida gets ready for what’s expected to be another active hurricane season, Jalal Farooq tells the Miami Herald how he’s preparing his business and what South Florida should be aware of on Miami Herald’s CEO Roundtable.

“As a business, the most important thing to make sure is that our data is secure, and we’ve done that,” says Jalal Farooq, principal and senior project engineer at Al-Farooq Corporation. “We specialize in engineering for impact-resistant windows, doors and building envelopes, and I would remind everyone that South Florida has the toughest hurricane codes in the country. With that in mind, if I were in an older building, I would have it checked out by a structural engineer.”

Al-Farooq Corporation has completed more than 15,000 projects around the country and is considered #1 in product approvals in South Florida. In business for more than 35 years, the Miami-based engineering firm is responsible for more than 50% of all Notice of Acceptance (NOA’s) in South Florida.

To read more, visit Miami Herald.

OBR’s Favorite Miami Buildings

Though Miami is known for its pastel-colored hotels on South Beach, its architecture is defined by a number of contrasting styles. Architects and developers have been transforming Miami’s cityscape into one of the new architectural capitals of America. From a contemporary luxury high-rise to a historical Spanish hotel, we’ve curated a list of our top 5 most iconic buildings.

obr-6-11-18-1

The Biltmore Hotel

The Biltmore Hotel was built in 1926 by hotel magnate John McEntee Bowman and land developer George Merrick, who combined his deep affection for lush South Florida landscape with a high regard for Italian, Moorish and Spanish architectural influences to create this architectural gem. The Biltmore Hotel was initially the tallest building in Florida at 315 feet and, today, its 23,000 square-foot pool is one of the largest hotel pools in the continental United States. The Biltmore’s rich history makes it Coral Gables’ most preeminent historic landmark.

obr-6-11-18-2

1111 Lincoln

The iconic garage on the west end of Lincoln Road was designed by world-renowned architects Herzog & de Meuron. The open-air structure rises seven stories and includes office space, retail, parking spaces and a mysterious rooftop penthouse. The seventh floor of the garage is also where 1111 Vibe hosts Skywave Yoga on Monday evenings. The view from the top overlooks Lincoln Road, Alton Road and as far as the shores of Biscayne Bay.

thumbnail

Solitair Brickell

Solitair Brickell, the latest luxury high-rise gracing Miami’s skyline, was recently completed by global architecture and design firm Stantec. The design of the 50-story building distinguishes itself with a unique angular, towering basket-weave design inspired by the majestic Medjool date palm tree popular in South Florida’s tropical landscape. Developed by ZOM Living, Solitair Brickell includes 483 residential units, millennial-friendly amenities and one of the highest rooftop resort-style pools in Miami.

obr-6-11-18-4

New World Center

The New World Center is a concert hall in the heart of South Beach, home to the New World Symphony, a post-graduate orchestral academy. A collaboration between the symphony’s artistic director, 11-time Grammy award-winning conductor, Michael Tilson Thomas, and Pritzker Prize-winning architect Frank Gehry, the building features multiple flexible spaces, cutting-edge media equipment, six stories of natural light and views of the iconic Miami Beach Art Deco skyline. A new 2.5-acre public park designed by the firm West 8, features the New World Center’s SoundScape park where New World Symphony WALLCAST concerts are presented on the building’s 7,000-square-foot projection wall.

obr-6-11-18-5

One Thousand Museum

One Thousand Museum is a high-rise residential condominium under construction in Downtown Miami designed by the late Pritzker Prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid. When completed, the 62-story building is expected to rise over 700 feet, making it one of the tallest buildings in Miami. The design of the building distinguishes itself with the contrast between the robust exoskeleton and the crystalline glazing of the glass façade beneath it. Gregg Covin, Todd Michael Glaser, Louis Birdman, Kevin Venger, Gilberto Bomeny and Regalia Group are the developers.

PCCSF’s Dr. Allan Greissman honored with JDCH Circle of Friends Award

mhs-224_preview

Dr. Allan Greissman of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida was recently honored by Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital Circle of Friends for his outstanding work as a pediatric intensivist.

JDCH’s Circle of Friends is part of the hospital’s giving societies. The award recognizes physicians that exemplify the spirit and mission of the hospital and provide extraordinary care for JDCH patients, families and community.

As a senior member of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida since 1994, Dr. Greissman develops procedural sedation programs, the care of the chronically ventilated patient and community outreach. He actively lectures throughout the South Florida community on various topics related to pediatrics.

Congratulations Dr. Greissman and thank you for your work!

Schüco Partners with Al-Farooq to Enter South Florida Market

aws_open_out_preview

Schüco USA has partnered with Al-Farooq Corporation to enter the South Florida market with the release of several products in 2018. Al-Farooq was contracted by the global building envelope specialist to test and approve the products to assure they meet South Florida’s high standards and regulations. The first product launched this month, an outward opening terrace door, is the first of its kind for the region. Al-Farooq Corporation is currently testing several other products for Schüco that should be released in South Florida later this year – just in time for hurricane season.

Al-Farooq Corporation, a Miami-based engineering consulting firm, is helping Schüco USA enter the South Florida market with the release of an outward opening terrace door, the Schüco AWS 75.SI+.

The global building envelope specialist has contracted the South Florida engineering firm to launch the product. Al-Farooq Corporation has tested and approved the product to assure it meets the rigorous standards and regulations for the hurricane market.

Ideal for South Florida’s rainy and windy seasonal climate, the terrace doors were designed for high-level water tightness.

The design consists of easy-access threshold options, which meets ADA half-inch threshold height limitations while also maintaining 15 PSF of water resistance test performance, far exceeding minimum requirements.

“It has been great to work with Schüco,” says Senior Engineer, Jalal Farooq. “Their team is knowledgeable, responsive, and their products are recognized around the world. We are pleased that they have chosen Al-Farooq Corporation to guide them to success in this hurricane market.”

To read the full story, visit Glass on Web.

PCCSF’s Dr. Greissman Weighs in on the Truth About Tamiflu

3-20-18

Dr. Allan Greissman of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida discussed with Motherly Tamiflu’s safety. As the only treatment for the flu, it’s important for parents to be aware of the medication’s potential side effects, especially during this deadly flu season.

This year’s flu season is already the worst North America has endured in a decade—which is, of course, a concern for parents of young children, who are more likely to experience serious complications from the illness.

If you or your children are struck by the flu, your health care provider is likely to write up a prescription for Tamiflu: If taken within 48 hours of symptom appearance, the antiviral drug may lessen the duration and severity of the flu. This application is recommended by both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for use in infants as young as 2 weeks old.

It is also approved for preventative treatment, meaning it may help other members in the household avoid the flu if a member of the family has already been diagnosed with the illness.

For parents of young children or those at higher risk for flu complications, this makes Tamiflu a particularly good option, says Allan Greissman, MD, a pediatric critical care specialist at Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida.

“Unfortunately this year we are seeing a large number of flu-positive pediatric patients having a very serious strain of the flu. We are also seeing many more deaths from the flu and many kids with other significant problems related to the flu,” Greissman tells Motherly. “So for that reason, getting a flu shot and treatment with Tamiflu should strongly be considered.”

To read the full story, visit Motherly.