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PCCSF’s Dr. Duncan Joins Women in Medicine Panel Discussion at Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital

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Three decades ago, just over a third of medical students were women. Today, women make up roughly 50 percent of medical students, which means women could make up 50 percent of the physician population in the near future.

To talk about this positive growth, FHI Communications invited PCCSF’s Dr. Teresa Duncan and two other leading female healthcare professionals to be a part of its 5th annual Women in Medicine Discussion: Celebrating the Legacy, Embracing the Future hosted at Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital on Tuesday, October 16th.

Dr. Duncan was and the panelists shared their unique story of the challenges they had to overcome and the opportunities that lie ahead for women in medicine.

“As women, we need to support each other,” said Dr. Duncan. “We benefit by openly talking to each other and understanding where we come from and where we’re going.”

Dr. Duncan began her training with a Bachelor of Arts in Biology from West Virginia University. She then obtained her doctor of medicine degree and continued her matriculation at Marshall University, also in West Virginia. Meanwhile, she was also completing her Pediatric Residency, where she served as chief resident.

Dr. Duncan went on to move to South Florida to complete a fellowship in Pediatric Critical Care at Jackson Memorial Hospital/University of Miami. She enjoyed living and working in Miami so much that she remained a “local” and has practiced critical care with Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida since 2003. Her interests include the care and transport of children who require specialized critical care needs and volunteer outreach services for the under served.

With more women like Dr. Duncan entering the field, it provides a new perspective, and proves that women are just as talented and capable in the medical profession.

PCCSF’s Dr. Gerald Lavandosky Gives Insight On When to Call 911

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Emergencies are hectic and can often times be confusing. Is medical attention needed within minutes of the incident? Or can it be resolved at home or the following day with your primary physician? Dr. Gerald Lavandosky of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida weighed in on when you should and shouldn’t call 911 on Reader’s Digest.

You should call when you or someone else is experiencing a severe allergic reaction. If anyone begins showing signs of a severe allergic reaction – increased heart rate, difficulty breathing, swelling tongue – call 911. Severe allergic reactions can lead to death quickly – in under an hour – so you may not have enough time to get to the emergency department. Emergency responders can give immediate treatment with epinephrine.

“Parents and caregivers are not trained medical professionals, so making a medical decision as to whether an allergic reaction is 911-worth can be challenging,” says Gerald Lavandosky, MD a pediatric critical care doctor at Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida.

To read the full story, visit Reader’s Digest.

 

PCCSF’s Dr. Greissman Discusses Meningitis with HealthyWay

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What may seem as a normal cold or flu could instead be the potentially life-threatening infection, meningitis. Because it’s important to act quickly, patients should understand the telltale signs of meningitis and take the appropriate medical action. Dr. Allan Greissman of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida shared with HealthyWay what symptoms patients should look out for.

Everyone gets sick from time to time. But sometimes, what we think of as a normal cold or flu might actually be far more dangerous. With flu season fast approaching, it’s important to understand and recognize the difference between normal illness and more serious conditions.

If flu-like symptoms come on and escalate quickly, it may mean you or a loved one has actually contracted meningitis. Meningitis is an infection that causes our meninges—the membranes that provide a protective barrier for the brain and spinal cord—to swell.

Meningitis is a serious condition that requires immediate attention from a medical professional. It can be life-threatening if left untreated, so it is important to understand the telltale symptoms. When you can spot symptoms early on, you can quickly seek out medical attention that can mitigate the negative effects of the disease.

Understanding the Types of Meningitis

There are a few different types of meningitis, but bacterial and viral meningitis are the two most common.

Bacterial meningitis is the most severe form of meningitis and can be fatal, especially if treatment is delayed. There are many types of bacteria that can cause meningitis, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Group B Streptococcus, and Listeria monocytogenes.

Thankfully, the introduction of and increased access to safe and effective vaccines resulted in a steady decrease in bacterial meningitis cases since the 1990s. However, cases that do occur are dangerous and can be fatal if left untreated.

Bacterial meningitis is treated with oral or IV antibiotics, and treatment can last between 10 and 21 days, according to Allan Greissman, MD, of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida.

The second most commonly experienced meningitis is viral meningitis. Although there is no vaccine for viral meningitis, you can be vaccinated against some of the viruses that could cause meningitis, like measles, mumps, or influenza.

It helps to think of viral meningitis as a potential complication of these other viruses. This means that, although you might catch measles, mumps, or the flu from someone with viral meningitis, that doesn’t necessarily mean you will also develop viral meningitis.

“Viral meningitis will run its course and should not [be], and is not, treated with IV antibiotics,” says Greissman. He notes that one exception is a form of viral meningitis caused by the herpes viruses, which is treated with an antiviral medication.

To read the full story, visit Healthy Way.

How Living Green Walls Improve a Space

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Living green walls, vertical gardens and biophilic designs offer all the benefits of nature inside a space that not only functions as living art but also improves our well-being.

Architecture and design firm Stantec recently completed the interior design of Wix’s new office and technical center located in Miami Beach. The 24,000 square foot office features a living wall made of green moss that displays the Wix logo while enhancing workers’ lives through a connection with nature. The indoor green wall increases the oxygen level throughout the office, reduces stress and enhances creativity and clarity of thought.

A tropical modern home, designed by Choeff Levy Fischman Architecture + Design, blurs the line between interior and exterior. The house, located on Allison Island, opens out onto an atrium with two 24-foot living walls. The living walls not only bring life to the modern architecture, but they also improve the house’s thermal insulation by adding a protective layer of plants.

Patrick Blanc, a French botanist and scientist, created the living wall at Juvia restaurant in South Beach, as well as the gardens at the Pérez Art Museum. Juvia’s wall not only regulates the rate of humidity outdoors, but it also cools the air. As the human footprint expands, these qualities are important. Unlike a green wall, which faces in one direction, Blanc used different types of plants on the hanging columns to create the vertical garden at Pérez Art Museum. The vertical garden restores the habitats of countless species while providing a space-efficient way of incorporating greenery into a building’s exterior design.

PCCSF’s Dr. Allan Greissman honored with JDCH Circle of Friends Award

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Dr. Allan Greissman of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida was recently honored by Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital Circle of Friends for his outstanding work as a pediatric intensivist.

JDCH’s Circle of Friends is part of the hospital’s giving societies. The award recognizes physicians that exemplify the spirit and mission of the hospital and provide extraordinary care for JDCH patients, families and community.

As a senior member of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida since 1994, Dr. Greissman develops procedural sedation programs, the care of the chronically ventilated patient and community outreach. He actively lectures throughout the South Florida community on various topics related to pediatrics.

Congratulations Dr. Greissman and thank you for your work!

PCCSF’s Dr. Greissman Weighs in on the Truth About Tamiflu

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Dr. Allan Greissman of Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida discussed with Motherly Tamiflu’s safety. As the only treatment for the flu, it’s important for parents to be aware of the medication’s potential side effects, especially during this deadly flu season.

This year’s flu season is already the worst North America has endured in a decade—which is, of course, a concern for parents of young children, who are more likely to experience serious complications from the illness.

If you or your children are struck by the flu, your health care provider is likely to write up a prescription for Tamiflu: If taken within 48 hours of symptom appearance, the antiviral drug may lessen the duration and severity of the flu. This application is recommended by both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for use in infants as young as 2 weeks old.

It is also approved for preventative treatment, meaning it may help other members in the household avoid the flu if a member of the family has already been diagnosed with the illness.

For parents of young children or those at higher risk for flu complications, this makes Tamiflu a particularly good option, says Allan Greissman, MD, a pediatric critical care specialist at Pediatric Critical Care of South Florida.

“Unfortunately this year we are seeing a large number of flu-positive pediatric patients having a very serious strain of the flu. We are also seeing many more deaths from the flu and many kids with other significant problems related to the flu,” Greissman tells Motherly. “So for that reason, getting a flu shot and treatment with Tamiflu should strongly be considered.”

To read the full story, visit Motherly.

MCAD Creates Design & Policy Strategies to Build Healthier Communities

dsc01415The Miami Center for Architecture & Design is making Miami-Dade County a healthier place to live, work and play by working with city leaders to adopt and implement Active Design Miami, a set of policy and design strategies for creating healthier streets, open spaces and buildings. The initiative is meant to change the way public and private spaces are designed by going beyond looking at the efficiency of a space, but rather taking into account the way they affect the health of the individuals who interact with them.

Miami-Dade County faces a number of challenges that can benefit from use of Active Design strategies. With two-thirds of Miami-Dade County’s 2.6 million residents overweight or obese, Active Design Miami comes at a perfect time. Its goal is to tackle the County’s rising obesity and chronic disease rates, and high rates of depression and other mental health issues affecting our communities.

As of today, Miami-Dade County and the cities of Miami, Miami Beach, Pinecrest, Surfside, South Miami and Key Biscayne have formally adopted Active Design Miami, and several other cities are also nearing adoption. The strategies are not one-size fits all, so cities can select the most appropriate ones for their needs. MCAD is currently working with the County and the six cities to implement the strategies that address the health needs of their respective city. In addition, Active Design Miami puts on several meetings and events that encourage healthy living. MCAD will continue working with the county and municipalities to implement these strategies.