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ICA Miami & Stantec Presented Climate Change, Art, and Architecture Panel Discussion

On Thursday, October 10th, ICA Miami in collaboration with Stantec hosted a discussion panel on Climate Change, Art, and Architecture. The event took place at the Miami Design District Palm Court.

Continuing ICA Miami’s dedication to understanding urgent environmental issues, this panel explored how anthropogenic effects apply pressure to architectural design and cultural production. It was led by renowned architectural critic Beth Dunlop. Panelists included John Malueg, manager of Stantec’s resiliency program; David Rifkind, interim chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture + Environmental and Urban Design at Florida International University; Elizabeth Wheaton, City of Miami Beach’s Director of the Environment & Sustainability Department; and Xavier Cortada, environmental artists and Professor of Practice at the University of Miami.  The panel also explored the concept of resiliency and the role of architects and artists in mitigating cultural, social, and environmental degradation.

Lincoln Road Takes A Big Step

Lincoln Road is home to our OBR headquarters, and we are excited about experiencing a revamp to the look and feel of South Beach’s iconic outdoor mall.

Recently, the City of Miami Beach announced plans to jump-start the first large-scale makeover of the walkway in more than 20 years, and according to reports, property owners agreed to tax themselves at a higher rate to pay for part of the ambitious plan to restore it. But who will cover the remaining cost?

The plans have been a long time coming. In 2014, the City hired James Corner Field Operations to draw up designs for a Lincoln Road makeover. His design includes a reorganization of café tables, new sculptural elements, and more public seating and green space – all much-needed improvements to Lincoln Road.

If the plan moves forward this time, there will also be a touched-up pattern on the ground running up the center of the walkway, reimagined planters, lights and public art. Although the proposal was halted in the planning stages for years, it looks like we’ll finally see some action, but who should cover the cost?

For more information, read the full story in The Miami Herald.