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ICA Miami & Stantec Presented Climate Change, Art, and Architecture Panel Discussion

On Thursday, October 10th, ICA Miami in collaboration with Stantec hosted a discussion panel on Climate Change, Art, and Architecture. The event took place at the Miami Design District Palm Court.

Continuing ICA Miami’s dedication to understanding urgent environmental issues, this panel explored how anthropogenic effects apply pressure to architectural design and cultural production. It was led by renowned architectural critic Beth Dunlop. Panelists included John Malueg, manager of Stantec’s resiliency program; David Rifkind, interim chair of the Department of Landscape Architecture + Environmental and Urban Design at Florida International University; Elizabeth Wheaton, City of Miami Beach’s Director of the Environment & Sustainability Department; and Xavier Cortada, environmental artists and Professor of Practice at the University of Miami.  The panel also explored the concept of resiliency and the role of architects and artists in mitigating cultural, social, and environmental degradation.

How Living Green Walls Improve a Space

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Living green walls, vertical gardens and biophilic designs offer all the benefits of nature inside a space that not only functions as living art but also improves our well-being.

Architecture and design firm Stantec recently completed the interior design of Wix’s new office and technical center located in Miami Beach. The 24,000 square foot office features a living wall made of green moss that displays the Wix logo while enhancing workers’ lives through a connection with nature. The indoor green wall increases the oxygen level throughout the office, reduces stress and enhances creativity and clarity of thought.

A tropical modern home, designed by Choeff Levy Fischman Architecture + Design, blurs the line between interior and exterior. The house, located on Allison Island, opens out onto an atrium with two 24-foot living walls. The living walls not only bring life to the modern architecture, but they also improve the house’s thermal insulation by adding a protective layer of plants.

Patrick Blanc, a French botanist and scientist, created the living wall at Juvia restaurant in South Beach, as well as the gardens at the Pérez Art Museum. Juvia’s wall not only regulates the rate of humidity outdoors, but it also cools the air. As the human footprint expands, these qualities are important. Unlike a green wall, which faces in one direction, Blanc used different types of plants on the hanging columns to create the vertical garden at Pérez Art Museum. The vertical garden restores the habitats of countless species while providing a space-efficient way of incorporating greenery into a building’s exterior design.