Posts

AIA Miami presents FitCity Miami 5 Conference

2-20-18-obr

AIA Miami has partnered with AARP, the Department of Health, and the Miami Center for Architecture & Design to host its fifth annual FitCity Miami 5 Conference on Thursday, February 22.

The annual conference delves into the intersection between health and the built environment and explores how the design of our cities – buildings, streets, public spaces and healthy food access – directly influence our community’s health and well-being. FitCity Miami presents the latest health findings for Americans focusing on the chronic diseases most affecting us today, such as obesity and diabetes.

This year’s conference will focus on Age-Friendly Active Design with a stress on public spaces and Senior Living communities. FitCity Miami encourages participants to expand their understanding of how the development of Age-Friendly communities in Miami-Dade has an important, measurable and long-term impact on public health.

Architects, planners, designers, public health professionals, academics, city managers, elected officials, community leaders and residents are invited to this open discourse on how policies, including design standards, infrastructure and building codes can be beneficial to community health and overall quality-of-life.

FitCity Miami 5 will feature keynote speaker Dr. Rodney Harrell, Director of Livability Thought Leadership at AARP; as well as Joanna Lombard, AIA, UM School of Architecture; Gensler’s Karla Valdivia, AIA; Christopher Adams, AIA; Shannon O’Kelley Berler, R.I.D., LEED AP, NEWH; with Adam Steinhoff, CEO of Dedicated IT; Maria Nardi, MDC Parks; Scott Brown, University of Miami Public Health.

FitCity Miami 5 will take place on Thursday, February 22 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Coral Gables Museum 235 Aragon Avenue, Coral Gables, Florida 33134.

Click here to register.

MCAD’s Active Design Miami Helps Make Key Biscayne a Healthier Place to Live

img_0194

The Miami Center for Architecture & Design worked with the Village of Key Biscayne to implement its latest initiative Active Design Miami and make the village a healthier place to live, work and play for all residents.

With its small size, natural beauty and health-conscious population, Key Biscayne is an ideal place for an innovative program aimed at using design to encourage active lifestyles.

Active Design Miami, a program inspired by New York City’s Active Design Guidelines, sets policy and design strategies to create healthier streets, open spaces and buildings. In Key Biscayne, it found an advocate in Village Council member Brett Moss, whose day job is an architect, general contractor and founder of MOSS Architecture + Design.

Moss, who frequently puts the Active Design standards into play for buildings his firm designs, said the Village joined several other South Florida communities earlier this year in adopting the standards as guiding principles. He would like to see that lead to development that promotes parks, outdoor activity, walking and biking, etc.

“I’m hoping that as we update our vision in Key Biscayne, we keep encouraging people to be outside and walk and bike to different places,” he said. “We should be looking at that in future policy making, zoning, codes and ordinances.”

Moss noted the Active Design philosophy focuses on parks and open spaces, development patterns, transportation and mobility. “I think it’s something that we’re always looking at in Key Biscayne anyway, so it was kind of a no-brainer for me to bring this to the Council.”

Cheryl Jacobs, executive vice president of Miami Center for Architecture and Design, which spearheads the Active Design Miami initiative, agreed Key Biscayne is the perfect place for the guidelines to play out. She applauded the Village for being an early adapter, becoming one of the first of 10 municipal governments and the Miami-Dade County government to sign on.

“Quality of life is really important in Key Biscayne, and anything a municipality can do to give residents an opportunity to have a better quality of life is a positive for that community,” Jacobs said. “Highlighting things like bike share, park access, golf cart access paths is really a quality of life issue. Key Biscayne adopted the concepts so readily, because they have already done some of these things.”

To read the full story, visit Islander News.

MCAD Creates Design & Policy Strategies to Build Healthier Communities

dsc01415The Miami Center for Architecture & Design is making Miami-Dade County a healthier place to live, work and play by working with city leaders to adopt and implement Active Design Miami, a set of policy and design strategies for creating healthier streets, open spaces and buildings. The initiative is meant to change the way public and private spaces are designed by going beyond looking at the efficiency of a space, but rather taking into account the way they affect the health of the individuals who interact with them.

Miami-Dade County faces a number of challenges that can benefit from use of Active Design strategies. With two-thirds of Miami-Dade County’s 2.6 million residents overweight or obese, Active Design Miami comes at a perfect time. Its goal is to tackle the County’s rising obesity and chronic disease rates, and high rates of depression and other mental health issues affecting our communities.

As of today, Miami-Dade County and the cities of Miami, Miami Beach, Pinecrest, Surfside, South Miami and Key Biscayne have formally adopted Active Design Miami, and several other cities are also nearing adoption. The strategies are not one-size fits all, so cities can select the most appropriate ones for their needs. MCAD is currently working with the County and the six cities to implement the strategies that address the health needs of their respective city. In addition, Active Design Miami puts on several meetings and events that encourage healthy living. MCAD will continue working with the county and municipalities to implement these strategies.